Purchasing a DSLR  camera is not just about going in the store, and picking up anything that shines more than others. It is something that you will be using for a long time, and that’s not just the camera. You will be getting yourself a number of different accessories along with it. For instance, the lenses, flash, etc. This is where more beginners make the mistake of choosing anything, or sometimes everything.

One thing that you should remember, is that it is always best to stick with one brand. What I mean by this, is that if you are purchasing the accessories of Nikon, then make sure that you have a Nikon camera. Because most of these accessories can be used among the lower end, as well as the higher end models of Nikon. And that’s the same thing with Canon, Pentax, and Sony.

Top 10 Best DSLR Camera’s  in India – 2018

ProductMegaPixelsSensor Max ISOLCD SizeView Finder Video ResolutionBuy Now
Product:
Nikon D5500
MegaPixels:
24.2 MP
Sensor :
DX format CMOS sensor
Max ISO:
25600
LCD Size:
3.2-inch
View Finder :
Optical
Video Resolution:
1080p FHD
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon
Product:
Canon Eos 80D
MegaPixels:
24.2 MP
Sensor :
APS-C CMOS sensor
Max ISO:
25600
LCD Size:
3 inches
View Finder :
Optical
Video Resolution:
720p Full HD
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon
Product:
Nikon D5300
MegaPixels:
24.2 MP
Sensor :
DX format CMOS sensor
Max ISO:
12800
LCD Size:
3.2-inch
View Finder :
Optical
Video Resolution:
1920 x 1080p FHD
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon
Product:
Nikon 1558 D5
MegaPixels:
20.8 MP
Sensor :
FX-Format CMOS Sensor
Max ISO:
3280000
LCD Size:
3.2-inch
View Finder :
Optical
Video Resolution:
3840 x 2160p UHD, 4K
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon
Product:
Nikon D3300
MegaPixels:
24.2 MP
Sensor :
DX format CMOS sensor
Max ISO:
12800
LCD Size:
3-inch
View Finder :
Optical
Video Resolution:
720 x 1080p FHD
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon
Product:
Canon Eos 5D Mark IV
MegaPixels:
30.4 MP
Sensor :
Full-frame CMOS sensor
Max ISO:
102400
LCD Size:
3.2-inch
View Finder :
Optical
Video Resolution:
720 x 1080p FHD, 4K
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon
Product:
Nikon D3400
MegaPixels:
24.2 MP
Sensor :
DX-format CMOS
Max ISO:
25600
LCD Size:
3-inch
View Finder :
Digital
Video Resolution:
1920 x 1080p Full HD, 4K
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon
Product:
Nikon D810
MegaPixels:
36.3 MP
Sensor :
FX-format CMOS sensor
Max ISO:
51200
LCD Size:
3.2-inch
View Finder :
Optical
Video Resolution:
1080p Full HD
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon
Product:
Sony Alpha A7RM2
MegaPixels:
42.4 MP
Sensor :
EXMOR R CMOS sensor
Max ISO:
102400
LCD Size:
3-inch
View Finder :
Digital
Video Resolution:
3840 x 2160 QFull HD, 4K
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon
Product:
Canon EOS 1300D
MegaPixels:
18 MP
Sensor :
APS-C CMOS sensor
Max ISO:
12800
LCD Size:
3-inch
View Finder :
Optical
Video Resolution:
720 x 1080p FHD
Buy Now:
Buy On Amazon

What to Look for Before Buying a DSLR Camera ?

Tell anyone in a camera store that you’re “just starting out” with DSLR photography, and you will probably be considered a gullible buyer who can be lured into buying the leftovers of last year’s entry-level stock.

While there may be nothing wrong with the entry-level DSLRs from previous years (provided they come from a good brand like Nikon or Canon), there is a vital difference between “entry-level” and a camera you’d be comfortable with as a beginner.

This is because a camera must have certain basic features in order to be considered one of the ideal DSLR cameras for beginners. Let’s take a quick look at these:

Pixels Consideration

People are constantly advised that many of us require more mega-pixels in the cameras, these is a superb method to get you to find the newest camera. Manufactures will encourage you that your 20-25 mega pixel camera just isn’t sufficient but the fact is an average photographer might only need a minimal of 20-25 mega pixels so as to print their 4×6 photos at-home.

In order to print bigger pictures, then you’ll definitely require more mega-pixels however how often might you need larger prints. Although by spending a bit more cash to acquire a higher resolution camera, for example that have approximately 40 mega pixels, it’s possible to save cost as most don’t require so much.

Large Sensor Size

Professional photographers know that the megapixel battles raging in the point-and-shoot segment are essentially a result of aggressive marketing. Instead, they choose to focus on the sensor size, which decides the amount of detail that would be captured by the sensor.

While professionals can tweak settings to achieve beautiful images even when the sensor is not great, beginners need to have a decent sensor size in order to fully appreciate the merits of a DSLR.

Lenses

lenses are the most important thing after you purchase the camera. Those are the things that either make you the best photographer, or a mediocre one. There are obviously many other things that make you a better photographer, but using the proper lens for a proper shot is crucial.

And it is not necessary for you to go out and purchase all the lenses. If you never see yourself using anything beyond the 55-300mm telezoom along with the already combined 18-55mm, you don’t have to break the sweat.

Auto Focus

Most digital compact cameras get excellent auto-focus, optical zoom and automatic exposure settings. Simply need to switch them on and press the shutter, the camera does the rest for you without any prior knowledge or expertise. The lowest requirement for you is definitely a pair of steady hands.

It is asked to be aware of the moment taken for the camera to be ready to make a shot. How much time the camera takes to turns on and focus determines if you would be able to capture or miss that perfect moment.

Burst Mode and Shutter Speed

Unless you have a lot of experience, it is unlikely that you would be able to capture that one special moment with just one click. Chances are that you’d have to shoot a dozen images and then sift through them to find the one that truly captured the moment. If such moments involve sports, wildlife or even your child’s antics, the time difference between individual shots needs to be of the order of microseconds.

“Burst mode” allows you to shoot 4,6,10 or 12 images in such rapid succession. Shutter speed on the other hand decides how fast each image would be captured. Hence, you should look for cameras with shutter speeds of between 1/500 sec to 1/1000 sec and burst modes that allow at least 12 photos to be taken at one time.

Optical Image Stabilization (OIS)

Important for all categories of photographers but vital for those clicking in low light conditions or shooting fast-moving objects/people, optical image stabilization essentially reduces blurring in the photo. While optical image stabilization is achieved through a variety of means, each should be able to ensure that regardless of whether your hand shook or the subject whizzed past, your photo would be able to display the subject with the clarity obtained when clicking still subjects.

The alternative to OIS is to use a tripod or other stabilizing apparatus. Since many folks starting out with DSLRs prefer not to invest in any but the most necessary of accessories, it is always better to depend upon OIS than any stationary camera-holding surface/stand.

View Finder

The next thing you should consider while purchasing an DSLR camera, is the viewfinder. Most of the entry level DSLR’s make use of the pentamirrors, which are less bright and less heavy.

Professional DSLR or Entry Level DSLR?

Once you’ve decided the brand that you will stick to, the next thing is to choose the depth that you want to go into. Most of these cameras are priced at or below the 50,000  mark, and then you can purchase the accessory bundles with it. So it is you, who will have to decide how deep you want to go into.

If you are just getting started with photography, and just checking the waters, choosing something near the 50,000 mark is more than enough. Remember, you will also have to purchase the accessories that are not included in the cost of the camera.

Battery and Comfort

No matter how good the DSLR cameras are, it is important to remember that they can only prove their worth if they have enough battery juice. Whether your DSLR supports pencil batteries or a Li-ion slab, ensure from the DSLR camera reviews that these are capable of providing at least one day’s worth of service before requiring a recharge/replacement.

Last but not least, it cannot be denied that DSLRs are heavier and bulkier than other cameras. As such, a good shoulder strap and adequate arm support are vital if you intend to carry and use the camera for any amount of time. While most manufacturers keep this in mind, it is still ideal to “try out” the camera for an extended period of time following purchase so you can be sure that it is the right fit for your hands, eyes and shoulders.

How to Use A DSLR Camera to Click like A Pro ?

As any photography expert will tell you, DSLR cameras are all about controlling the ability of the camera to click photographs. Since photography is essentially a way of capturing the light entering the lens, such control effectively boils down to controlling the amount of light reaching the sensor and how the sensor deciphers it.

While this may seem simple in theory, the range of buttons and dials on the device can make anyone wonder whether learning how to use a DSLR camera is worth the trouble. To persuade you that it is indeed worth it, we’ll cover the basics of DSLR operation below.

Shooting Modes

Located on the top side of the camera would be a dial with a number of acronyms like AV, Auto+, etc. These decide the shooting mode of the camera ie the procedure and prioritizations your camera would choose when clicking the image. Broadly speaking, shooting modes include –

  • Full Auto/Auto+ – Here, the camera decides both the aperture and the shutter speed. As such, the camera would choose the amount of light entering the lens and the duration of such exposure for you depending on the ambient light conditions. Full auto would provide decent images but with the same amount of control the average point-and-shoot would give you.
  • Aperture Priority – Aperture priority allows you to decide the aperture of the camera. This is decided in “f-stops” ranging from f/1.0 to f/22 or even higher. As we explained while discussing DSLR lenses, lower apertures (ie those with a higher denominator) are capable of achieving high “depth of field”. Depth of field means that objects far away but in focus appear as sharp as those in the foreground.

Low apertures on the other hand keep the subject in the foreground in focus but blur out the background. Aperture priority lets you decide which scenario you want and then chooses your shutter speed based on the aperture you’ve chosen.

  • Shutter Priority – The speed of the shutter decides the clarity of the image. In many instances, such clarity would demand keeping the shutter speed low – well below 1/100th of a second. However, where you need to swap detail for artistic beauty (eg. while clicking waves or shadows on mountains) it is better to go for a low shutter speed. As you’d expect, the camera decides the aperture based on your shutter speed.
  • Full Manual – Here you choose both the aperture and the shutter speed yourself. This is the most advanced and most complex of modes as you may well find yourself clicking multiple poorly-lit and/or poorly-rendered images before you find the right settings. For professionals though, this is the only means of setting themselves apart from the rest.

Metering

When learning how to use a DSLR camera, you would probably want to leave the rendition of colours to the camera itself. At a more advanced stage though, you would want to decide how the greys and blacks in your image (and by corollary all the other colours) are rendered. In other words, you want to decide the way the camera interprets the exposure of the sensor to light. The way the camera achieves such choice of colours is called “metering”. There are 3 types of metering –

  • Average – Average metering studies the entire image and tries to average out the greys to “18% grey” or “middle grey”. This is the automatic mode applied when you have not chosen anything.
  • Centre weighted – Centre-weighted metering causes the camera to focus on a large area at the centre of the image. Based on the tones there, the entire image is metered to 18% grey.
  • Spot metering – The most advanced of modes, spot metering focuses on a specific part of the image and adjusts the tones of the image accordingly. This allows the subject, wherever it/he/she may be, to be properly highlighted.

ISO

ISO refers to the sensitivity of the camera sensor to the light coming in. Think of ISO as placing a pair of sunglasses over the lens and then adjusting the darkness of the shades to achieve the correct sensitivity. Hence, on a bright sunny day, you can keep the sensitivity to a minimum ie ISO 100 or 200 and get great pictures.

In dark conditions however, you have to increase the ISO to levels as high as 1600 to achieve decent images. However, because of this increased sensitivity, the clarity of the image suffers and “noise” ie graininess of the image grows.

Exposure Compensation

While metering allows you to decide which part of the image to use to decide the overall appearance of the image, exposure compensation lets you change the camera’s “mind-set” to make it apply metering that is more or less than 18% grey.

This is achieved by using a tiny button with +/- on it. Pressing + causes exposure compensation above 18% grey and – pulls it below that median. This translates to lighter/darker images compared to what the camera would normally have clicked.

Focus

Last but perhaps most importantly, the object has to be “in focus” for it to be shot. In other words, the camera’s lens must be “looking at” the object just as we would. Focus is of three types viz –

  1. Manual focus – Manual focus requires you to adjust the lenses or your position until the image is in focus. This focus mode is gradually disappearing courtesy of the appearance of auto-focus.
  2. Autofocus manual – Here, the camera focuses only when told to do so. Holding down the shutter button halfway creates a green/blue triangle/circle that lets you know where the focus of the camera is. Pressing the button completely clicks an image, letting go causes the camera to lose focus again.
  3. Autofocus continuous – Ideal for fast moving objects, this mode focuses constantly. Whenever you press the shutter button completely, the camera clicks the image based on its last focus.

Unlike a majority of guides that explain how to use a DSLR camera, we decided to stay away from a “do this first, then do this” approach since we know that any of the above metrics can be modified at any time and in no particular order. Indeed, you may well need to modify multiple settings multiple times before you can achieve that perfect image.

In the beginning however, it is advisable to keep experimentation within the bounds of one or two metrics. As you gain experience and confidence, you can modify multiple metrics simultaneously and in doing so, bring out the uniqueness of your creativity to the maximum extent allowed by your DSLR camera.

Conclusion

While the need for a good battery or a comfortable strap may seem like a no-brainer, others like OIS or sensor size may appear somewhat technical and confusing. The good news is that all of this information is readily available in the product details and DSLR camera reviews.

Based on this data and the type of photography you intend to undertake, you can create a checklist of features that DSLR cameras for beginners must have. Once this list is ready, deciding which camera to purchase will become a lot easier!